Technology News

Technology News

  • Why you should buy the $600 iPhone XR instead of the $700 iPhone 11 (AAPL) 19/09/2019
    Apple announced a trio of new smartphones on September 10: the iPhone 11, the iPhone 11 Pro, and the iPhone 11 Pro Max. 2017's iPhone X started at $1,000, as did 2018's iPhone XS — but the iPhone 11 starts at just $700. It might sound like a big price cut, but it's essentially a much smaller price cut: The iPhone 11 is replacing 2018's cheaper iPhone model, the iPhone XR, which retailed for $750. In fact, the iPhone 11 and the iPhone XR are so similar that  you should probably just buy the less expensive iPhone XR — which Apple now sells for $600 — instead of the iPhone 11. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. In 2019, Apple sells at least five main versions of its most popular device: The iPhone. The five seen above only represent the highest level overview of the many flavors of iPhone available as of this September. If you're buying an iPhone 8, for example, you could also opt for the slightly larger — and more expensive — iPhone 8 Plus. That's before we start talking about how much storage you'll need, or which color you want. With all that choice, you might be wondering: Which iPhone is right for me? For most people buying an iPhone in 2019, the iPhone XR is still the best one to buy. Here's why:Last year, the iPhone XR was Apple's most popular phone. This year, the iPhone 11 offers a minor upgrade to that device alongside a lower price tag. In 2018, Apple introduced the iPhone XR as the "budget" option of iPhone. You could buy the $1,000 iPhone XS — the follow up to 2017's iPhone X — or you could opt for the cheaper iPhone XR, which started at $750. The XR had a less-fancy screen, and slightly less fancy materials, but still looked and felt like a premium Apple device.  Given the incredibly high starting price for the iPhone X and iPhone XS, the XR was a hit with millions of people looking for an iPhone without a four-figure price tag.  It's no surprise that, in 2019, Apple's sequel to the XR is the iPhone 11 — the "budget" phone has become the flagship, with Apple positioning its $1,000 iPhone option as the iPhone 11 "Pro" model.  Like so many iPhones before it, the difference between 2018's iPhone XR and 2019's iPhone 11 are incremental. If you look closely at the specs of the iPhone XR and the specs of the iPhone 11, you'll quickly realize that the iPhone 11 is an evolutionary update to last year's iPhone XR. For starters, they have the same type of screen ("Liquid Retina HD"), and it's the same size (6.1 inches). The iPhone XR uses 2018's A12 chip, and the iPhone 11 uses 2019's A13 (Apple introduces a new version of its iPhone chip every year). While the iPhone XR has a single camera sensor, the iPhone 11 has two. And then there are the build materials: The iPhone 11 is made of glass and aluminum, just as the iPhone XR was. In short: The iPhone 11 is a minor upgrade to the iPhone XR that adds a slightly more powerful chip, a second camera sensor, and a slightly longer battery life. Given the $100 price difference between the XR and the 11, those upgrades may be enough to convince you to drop the extra cash.  At $600, the iPhone XR is the "just right" option for most people. But let's be honest: The chip inside the iPhone XR is plenty powerful, and its camera is excellent.  You could drop the extra $100 and get an iPhone 11, but why spend that money for incremental upgrades?  For the vast majority of people looking for a new iPhone in 2019, the iPhone XR is more than enough machine. It's not the least-expensive option — that's the iPhone 8 at $450 — but it is the most capable iPhone for under $700.
  • Tesla's Model 3 just earned another big safety award (TSLA) 19/09/2019
    Tesla's Model 3 sedan has received the "top safety pick plus" designation from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the organization announced on Thursday. That makes the Model 3 the second electric vehicle to receive the IIHS' highest safety rating, after the Audi e-tron SUV. The Model 3, released in 2017, has also earned the highest safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), along with Tesla's prior two vehicles, the Model S sedan and Model X SUV. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Tesla's Model 3 sedan has received the "top safety pick plus" designation from the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety (IIHS), the nonprofit organization announced on Thursday. That makes the Model 3 the second electric vehicle to receive the IIHS' highest safety rating, after the Audi e-tron SUV. Read more: Every electric vehicle you can buy in the US To earn a "top safety pick plus," rating, a vehicle must perform well in a variety of crash tests. The vehicle must receive a "good" rating in tests related to its front, side, roof, and head restraints, an "advanced" or "superior" rating for front crash prevention and a "good" rating for its headlights. "Vehicles with alternative powertrains have come into their own," IIHS chief research officer David Zuby said in a press release. "There's no need to trade away safety for a lower carbon footprint when choosing a vehicle." See also: Apply here to attend IGNITION: Transportation, an event focused on the future of transportation, in San Francisco on October 22. The Model 3, released in 2017, has also earned the highest safety rating from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), along with Tesla's prior two vehicles, the Model S sedan and Model X SUV. But NHTSA and Tesla have butted heads over the electric-car maker's claim that the Model 3 is the safest car the agency has tested. Last October, NHTSA sent Tesla a cease-and-desist letter telling it to stop making that claim. Are you a current or former Tesla employee? Do you have an opinion about what it's like to work there? Contact this reporter at mmatousek@businessinsider.com. Read more: Tesla trolls Porsche with a new Supercharger at the Nürburgring, where a modified Model S beat the Porsche Taycan's lap time by 20 seconds From advocating for nuking Mars to feuding on Twitter, here's how Tesla's CEO Elon Musk spent his summer Elon Musk reportedly suggested that Tesla needs to be more like Amazon to improve its delivery system With Tesla's Elon Musk and Rivian's RJ Scaringe, we have the Henry Ford and Alfred Sloan of electric vehicles SEE ALSO: UFC fighter Kevin Lee put his Tesla on autopilot so he could play 'Super Smash Bros.' on the road Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Watch SpaceX's 'most difficult launch ever'
  • How to turn off your PS4 controllers manually or automatically, to save battery when you're not using them 19/09/2019
    You should know how to turn off a PS4 controller to conserve its charge when it's not in use, as a DualShock 4 controller only has a battery life of about four to eight hours.  You can put the Dualshock controller to sleep easily by holding the PS button down for about 10 seconds, or by using the Quick Menu to choose "Turn Off Device." To get more out of each charge, you can set the controller to go to sleep automatically after some period of inactivity.   Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. It's easy to drain the battery in your PS4's DualShock 4 controller — at the best of times, you'll get no more than about eight hours on a single charge, and often it lasts more like four or five hours. So if your controller is sitting idle, you should turn it off to conserve power.  There are several ways to turn off your PS4 controller. Odds are you already know the most common method: When you power down the PS4, the controller turns off as well.  Here are all the ways to put your DualShock 4 controller to sleep while keeping your PS4 up and running. Check out the products mentioned in this article: PlayStation 4 (From $299.99 at Best Buy) Sony DualShock 4 Wireless Controller (From $64.99 at Best Buy) How to turn off a PS4 controller manually Using the PS button The fastest and easiest way to turn off your controller is by pressing and holding the PS button in the center of the controller for about 10 seconds.  Using the Quick Menu 1. On the controller, press and hold the PS button for about two seconds, until the Quick Menu appears. 2. Select "Sound/Devices." 3. Select "Turn Off Device." 4. On the Turn Off Device screen, choose your DualShock 4.  How to turn off a PS4 controller automatically after a period of time 1. On the controller, press and hold the PS button for about two seconds, until the Quick Menu appears. 2. Select "Sound/Devices." 3. Select "Set Time Until Controllers Turn Off" and then choose the time you want to wait — 10 minutes, 30 minutes, or an hour.  After making this selection, once the controller is inactive for the selected time, it will turn off automatically. Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech: How to charge a PlayStation 4 controller using your PS4 console How to turn a PS4 on or off, or put it into Rest Mode, using the controller or system How to delete a PlayStation 4 user account, if you've run out of space for accounts How to properly clean a PS4 console, on both the exterior and interior SEE ALSO: The best 4K TVs you can buy Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: I cleaned my entire apartment with 4 of Amazon's highest-rated cleaning robots, but I could've done a much better job myself
  • TECH COMPANIES IN FINANCIAL SERVICES: How Apple, Amazon, and Google are taking financial services by storm (AMZN, AAPL, GOOGL) 19/09/2019
    This is a preview of the TECH COMPANIES IN FINANCIAL SERVICES research report from Business Insider Intelligence. 14-Day Risk Free Trial: Get full access to this and all Payments industry research reports. Tech giants are set to grab up to 40% of the $1.35 trillion in US financial services revenue from incumbent banks, per McKinsey. Three of the largest US tech companies — Apple, Google, and Amazon — are particularly encroaching on financial services and threatening incumbents with their size and ability to attract massive, loyal user bases. Apple is deepening its financial services play as a means of invigorating revenue, and its expertise could make it a legitimate threat to legacy players. Google's platform-agnostic approach, wide international penetration, and top talent position it as a hub with unrivaled global reach beyond just consumer payments. And Amazon — which has eaten up market share in every industry it's touched, and now has its sights on financial services — could swiftly undercut legacy players. In The Tech Companies In Financial Services report, Business Insider Intelligence will examine the moves that Apple, Google, and Amazon are making to gain a larger foothold in the global financial services industry. We will then detail each tech company's threat to incumbents and outline potential next steps based on their existing moves in the financial services sphere. The companies mentioned in the report include: Apple, Amazon, Google, Goldman Sachs, Mastercard, Barclaycard, Citi, Chase, Capital One, Paytm, and PhonePe. Here are some key takeaways from the report: Apple's expertise in consumer-facing tech products makes it a legitimate threat to legacy players. Its next move could be a debit card or PFM app, both of which would be cohesive with its existing offerings. Google's money movement and commerce services form a payments hub with unrivaled global reach. Google could pursue global expansion by modifying its offerings in other markets like it did in India, pursuing Europe, and even delving into digital remittances. Amazon is an expert disruptor — and it has its sights set on the financial services industry next. Amazon could develop checking and savings accounts, bring Amazon Pay in-store, and white-label its Amazon Go store technology to deepen its financial services footprint. In full, the report: Outlines the threat posed by Apple, Amazon, and Google to legacy financial players. Identifies each tech giant's strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats moving further into financial services. Discusses each company's moves in financial services and their anticipated next steps in the space. Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it: Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >> Purchase & Download Now Subscribe to a Premium pass to Business Insider Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and more than 250 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now The choice is yours. But however you decide to acquire this report, you've given yourself a powerful advantage in your understanding of tech companies in financial services. Join the conversation about this story »
  • Here's how to download iOS 13, Apple's big new iPhone update (AAPL) 19/09/2019
    Apple's new software update for the iPhone arrived on Thursday. When it's available to download, iOS 13 will appear in your device's settings menu. Here's how to download the update and what new features you can expect. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The time has finally come to install Apple's latest version of the operating system for iPhones. While the public beta of iOS 13 has been available for months, the update is rolling out for everyone on Thursday. IOS 13 is loaded with new features, including a "dark mode" display option, faster app downloads, improvements to photo editing and Apple Maps, and more. The update started to roll out to users around 12:45 p.m. ET on Thursday. To update to iOS 13, follow these steps: Back up your iPhone, just to be safe. You can do that by going to Settings > iCloud > iCloud Backup > Back Up Now. Download the update. Visit your system preferences and wait for the update to appear. You can find it under General > Software Update > Download and Install. Don't worry. If iOS 13 is taking longer than expected to download or appear in your settings, don't panic. Apple's servers can get flooded with millions of simultaneous downloads, so it can take a minute for the update to show up. Read more: Here are 9 of the best new features coming to your iPhone today with iOS 13 Here are the changes you can expect when you upgrade: Dark mode. iOS 13 will include a system-wide dark mode that works on all Apple apps and that developers can add to their third-party apps. The display mode is meant to be easier on the eyes and optimize reading in the dark. Better photo- and video-editing tools. Photo-editing controls in iOS 13 are beefed up, allowing you to adjust the sharpness, color, and contrast of photos with more precision. You can also apply these editing tools to videos for the first time, rotate videos from landscape to portrait, and fine-tune their aspect ratio. An upgrade to Apple Maps. Apple Maps may not have the best reputation compared with its competitors, but iOS 13 is meant to drastically improve the app. Starting with US cities in 2019 — and the rest of the world in years to come — Maps will have updated details about roads, buildings, and parks. It will also now include a feature that allows users to look around at the street level, like Google Maps' Street View. Additionally, you'll be able to add favorite locations and more easily share places with friends. Mail improvements. The Mail app will now allow you to adjust font style, color, size, and alignment, including indents and bulleted lists. This rich-text support aims to make it easier to send professional emails from your mobile device. Reminders is getting an AI boost. The Reminders app will get more robust, and Siri will use artificial intelligence to suggest reminders based on what you're doing. You'll also be able to include dates, times, locations, checklists, flags, and photos in reminders you create using iOS 13. Swipeable typing. With QuickPath, you can swipe across your iPhone keyboard to type, if you prefer, rather than tapping each letter separately. This update is also boosted by AI. For a full list of updates coming with iOS 13, visit Apple's website.SEE ALSO: Apple's new iPhone 11 and iPhone 11 Pro quietly ditched a feature that was first introduced 4 years ago Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Watch SpaceX's 'most difficult launch ever'
  • Netflix must launch a cheaper, ad-supported plan to combat Disney, Apple, and Amazon, according to a Wall Street analyst (NFLX) 19/09/2019
    Faced with competition from Apple and Disney, Netflix may soon be forced to introduce a cheaper plan that's supported by ads, Needham analyst Laura Martin says.  Apple and Disney are making their services free or very cheap. Netflix, meanwhile, has stuck to a starting price of $9 per month in the US and its most popular plan is $13.  Martin thinks Netflix may need to introduce a $6 per month plan with limited ads in the US, similar to CBS All Access, to compete. Click here for more BI Prime stories. Apple and Disney's distribution plans could force Netflix to introduce a cheaper tier, with ads, one Wall Street analyst says. The streaming-video giant has repeatedly said it does not want to be in the business of selling ads. But Apple and Disney are changing the economic reality of the streaming-video industry in the US, Laura Martin, senior internet and media analyst at Needham, told Business Insider. The two companies, which are launching subscription-video platforms in November, recently announced bundles and other offerings that effectively make their services free or very cheap for users who buy or subscribe to their other products. "The wealthiest people are going to get their SVOD services for free," Martin said. "Netflix cannot sustain just a $13 or $10 price point. They must have a cheaper option, or people will disconnect." Netflix will have to introduce a $6-per-month service supported by advertising to compete, Martin previously told CNBC's "Squawk Alley" on Wednesday. Apple, Disney, and Amazon are making it very cheap for some people to access their services. Today, Netflix's cheapest plan costs $9 per month in the US. Its standard and most popular plan costs $13 per month, and its most expensive costs $16. Apple, meanwhile, is giving its $5-per-month Apple TV Plus service away free for one year to anyone who buys an iPhone, iPad, Apple TV, iPod touch, or Mac. The service will launch with nine original series, making its library magnitudes smaller than Netflix. Disney is bundling its forthcoming $6-per-month Disney Plus service with its other streaming services, ESPN Plus and the ad-supported version of Hulu, for $13 per month. Martin said she wouldn't be surprised to also see Disney offer a few months of the service for free to theme park goers. Amazon Prime Video also comes "free" with a $119-per-year Prime shipping membership. People who can't afford to buy new Apple devices, Prime shipping subscriptions, or larger streaming bundles will have to balance the costs of a Netflix subscription with the other options that are hitting the marketing. That may mean cutting Netflix in favor of one of these other services, which also have lower starting points than Netflix. "Netflix too must have lower-cost option," Martin said.  Martin said CBS All Access, which charges $6 per month with ads — fewer ads than air on its TV channel — and $10 per month without, is a good model for Netflix. Two-thirds of the service's roughly 4 million subscribers pay for the version with ads. While Netflix has a larger library, CBS has live sports, which makes them comparable, Martin said. Netflix will need advertising to offset the cost of the cheaper plan and continuing to invest heavily in content, because it doesn't have another meaningful revenue stream besides subscriber fees, Martin said. "Reed [Hastings] has said repeatedly he will not do ad supported," Martin said, referring to the Netflix CEO. "Our contention is he must have an ad-supported option in order to lower that price point." Analysts at Nomura's Instinet have also said advertising revenue could help improve Netflix's bottom line, cut down on its debt load, and improve free cash flow. Netflix has already started to experiment with lower-cost plans outside of the US. It introduced a mobile-only option in India that costs roughly half the price of its next cheapest tier. Read more: Netflix's new $3 plan in India is evidence of tough competition from rivals like Amazon and Hotstar "Netflix has used the tie ring philosophy to great success in India and other foreign countries," Martin said. "It must bring that tiering and marketing notion to America. It must have far cheaper service." Read Business Insider's other coverage of Netflix approach to advertising:  Netflix could drastically cut its cash burn with a Spotify-like model that includes an ad-supported free tier Netflix calls speculation that it's moving into selling advertising 'false' 'It gives a sense of elitism': Netflix is pioneering brand deals for streaming TV, but some partners bemoan its approach Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Tobey Maguire's 'Spider-Man' is a classic, even though it's one of the more under-appreciated superhero films
  • 17 science 'facts' you might have learned in school that aren't true 19/09/2019
    Science is an ongoing process, which means new discoveries often upend old theories. Contrary to what many people learned in school, Pluto is not a planet (well, sort of), dinosaurs didn't look like the pictures in your textbook, and atoms aren't the most basic components of matter. Here are some science "facts" you may have learned in school that aren't true. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. If you were to file into a classroom and open your notebook for science class today, the subject matter might be a little different than when you were in school. Science is a body of knowledge that's constantly growing and changing. New discoveries or studies often lead to changes in old theories and sometimes even invalidate them altogether. That means some of the "facts" you learned in school aren't necessarily true anymore. For example, dinosaurs probably didn't look the way your textbook depicted them them. The origins of Homo sapiens aren't as neat as the timeline you might have learned. And many of the nutrition and exercise guidance from your health classes have been debunked. Here are some science facts you may have learned in school that aren't true anymore.SEE ALSO: 9 things that aren't helping the environment as much as you think they are, from recycling to carbon offsets Myth: We don't know what caused the dinosaurs' mass extinction. Scientists used to scratch their heads about what caused the extinction that ended the age of dinosaurs — theories ranged from low dino sex drives to a world overrun by caterpillars. But then geophysicists stumbled upon Chicxulub in 1978, a crater in the Yucatan peninsula made by the 6-mile-wide asteroid that likely triggered the dinosaurs' demise. Since that discovery, researchers have uncovered more details about the asteroid's impact. The collision caused a mile-high tsunami, sparked wildfires, and released billions of tons of sulfur into the atmosphere, blotting out the sun for years. The asteroid may not be the full explanation, though. Some scientists argue that volcanic eruptions in modern-day India also contributed to the dinosaurs' downfall. Myth: Dinosaurs were scaly, earthy-colored lizards. Dinosaurs  — even the Tyrannosaurus rex — likely had feathers. Feathers are rarely preserved in the fossil record, but scientists have uncovered feathered dino fossils in China and Siberia, suggesting plumage was common across the great lizards. "Probably that means the common ancestor of all dinosaurs had feathers," Pascal Godefroit, a paleontologist who authored a 2014 study on a key Siberian fossil, told National Geographic. Underneath the feathers, dinos could have had brightly colored scales, like many modern-day lizards.  Feathers have never been found on a T. rex specimen, but fossils of other tyrannosaur species do have preserved feathers. So paleontologists can assume the T. rex had them, too. Though adult T. rexes were mostly covered in scales, scientists think they had patches of feathers on attention-getting areas like the head and tail. Myth: The Tyrannosaurus rex was a running, roaring lizard like the one you saw in "Jurassic Park." Though a terrifying predator, the "king of the dinosaurs" probably did not roar or sprint. The dinosaur's long stride could carry it as fast as 25 mph, but it never reached a suspended gait, since it always had at least one leg on the ground. A 2016 study suggested that instead of roaring, the T. rex probably cooed, hooted, and made deep-throated booming sounds like the modern-day emu. Myth: Neanderthals were dumb brutes who didn't mingle with Homo sapiens. Evidence of Neanderthal cave art in Europe significantly predates similar paintings by Homo sapiens. Our extinct cousins also crafted tools and ornaments out of stone and bone, made tar glue from birch bark that allowed them to attach wooden handles to stone tools, and cooked  with fire (though they may have relied on lightning strikes to start the flames).  Perhaps this intelligence is what inspired early humans to breed with Neanderthals and Denisovans, another early hominin species. Myth: Homo sapiens first emerged 200,000 years ago in east Africa. Groups of Homo sapiens may have evolved at the same time all over Africa, instead of in one primary location, a 2018 paper suggested. A skull discovered in 2017 also showed that was happening about 300,000 years ago — farther back in history than previously thought. Not all of these groups would have looked identical, but they may have been close enough to all be considered Homo sapiens. The groups would have interacted with each other and migrated across the continent.  So instead of first emerging in one area in east or south Africa then spreading from there, distantly related groups of humans across the continent could have become more similar over time. Read more: A handful of recent discoveries has transformed our entire understanding of human history Myth: Camels store water in their humps. Camels humps store fat, which the animals burn for fuel when traveling long distances with limited resources. A camel can use that fat to replace approximately three weeks' worth of food, according to Animal Planet. It's the camel's red blood cells that enable it to last a week without drinking water. Unlike other creatures, camels' oval-shaped blood cells are more flexible and enable them to store large quantities of water. Myth: Bats are blind. Many bats rely on echolocation to navigate, but that doesn't mean they can't see.  Myth: The food pyramid is the gold standard of nutrition. The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) released the Food Guide Pyramid in 1992, but much of the nutritional advice it offered has since been debunked. The pyramid made no distinction between refined carbs like white bread and whole grains like brown rice. There is also no distinction between the healthiest proteins (like beans, nuts, and fish) and red meat, which can increase one's risk of cancer and heart disease. The chart also banished healthy fats to the "use sparingly" tip of the pyramid, lumping them in with added sugars and trans fats from processed oils and packaged foods. However, in the mid-1990s, Harvard researchers estimated that trans fats led to roughly 50,000 preventable deaths each year in the US. And research shows that the healthy unsaturated fats found in foods like nuts, seeds, and avocados are crucial to a balanced diet. Myth: Milk is good for your bones. Much of the hype about milk comes from dairy industry marketing campaigns, though the USDA helped, too. A page on the department's website tells us that adults should drink three cups of milk per day, mostly for calcium and vitamin D, and that kids should drink two to three cups to build strong bones.  However, multiple studies show there isn't an association between drinking more milk (or taking calcium and vitamin D supplements) and experiencing fewer bone fractures. Some studies have even found an association between milk drinking and higher overall mortality; that doesn't mean milk consumption was the cause, but it's not an endorsement. Another page on the USDA website has changed the three-cup recommendation to encompass the entire dairy category, which includes yogurt and cheese. Myth: Crunches and sit-ups are great for your core. A lot of us practiced this move in gym class, but many experts have told Business Insider that crunches are not efficient core-builders. They can also damage your back and neck if you do them wrong. The nonprofit American Council on Exercise says that when it comes to crunches, a lot of people "perform this movement too rapidly" and cheat by using their hip flexors. "This technique tilts the pelvis anteriorly, increasing the stress on the low back, and should be avoided," the council says on its website. Read more: Traditional sit-ups and crunches are terrible for you, according to personal trainers — here's what they suggest instead Myth: Drinking alcohol kills your brain cells. Alcohol can damage the connections between your brain cells, but it doesn't actually kill them. Still, many studies have shown that excessive drinking over long periods of time can damage the brain, and children with fetal alcohol syndrome often have fewer brain cells. Studies have also found that heavy (and even moderate) drinkers can have increased brain shrinkage. Myth: Diamonds come from coal. Diamonds and coal are both made from carbon, but most of Earth's diamonds are much older than its coal. Diamonds also form much deeper in the Earth's high-pressure mantle, via a process that has nothing to do with coal. Coal, meanwhile, is found in Earth's crust. Read more: Russia is the world's largest producer of diamonds. I toured a mine in Siberia that produced 1.4 million carats of diamonds in 2018 — here's what it was like. Myth: Pluto is the ninth planet. (Well, this one's complicated.) The International Astronomical Union (IAU) originally classified Pluto as the ninth planet that orbits the sun. But in 2005, Eris, another really big space rock that orbits the sun, was discovered. It's 27% larger than Pluto. That forced the IAU to rethink what a planet actually is. The IAU decided on criteria that neither Pluto nor Eris met, so neither could be considered one of the major planets that orbits the sun. Instead, they're both dwarf planets. So yes, Pluto is a planet, it's just a dwarf planet. Myth: Mars is a desert of red dust with no liquid water. Three years' worth of radar data suggests that a lake of liquid water might lurk beneath Mars' polar ice caps, according to a study published last year. Previous findings also indicated that liquid water might flow seasonally across Mars' surface, though the discovery has been thrown into question. Myth: Nothing moves faster than light. Light moves at 299,792,458 meters per second in a vacuum, but it slows down when it travels through various substances. For example, light moves 25% slower through water and 59% slower through diamond. Electrons, neutrons, or neutrinos can outpace photons of light in such media — though they have to bleed off energy as radiation when they do. The expanding fabric of space also once exceeded light-speed during the Big Bang, and physicists think wormholes and quantum entanglement might defy the rule as well. Read more: The speed of light is torturously slow, and these 3 simple animations by a scientist at NASA prove it Myth: The phases of matter are liquid, solid, and gas (and maybe plasma). This may not be elementary school science material, but there are many more states of matter: quark-gluon plasma, superfluids, Bose-Einstein condensates, Fermionic condensates, photonic matter, and possibly even supersolids — just to name a few. Liquid, solid, and gas are just the states you can observe in everyday life. Plasma, which some people learned about as the state of matter for lightning, is the most abundant form of matter in the universe. Myth: Atoms, the building blocks of matter, can be broken down only into electrons, protons, and neutrons. Matter gets much smaller and more complex than that. Quantum physics predicts 18 types of elementary particles, and 16 of them have been detected by experiments. Protons and neutrons are made up of quarks, which are held together by gluons. Dave Mosher and Aylin Woodward contributed reporting to this post.
  • A fake interview with Vladimir Putin demonstrates how convincing deepfakes could be created in real-time in just a matter of years 19/09/2019
    Deepfakes — videos manipulated with AI to make someone appear to say or do something they haven't actually said or done — have become a real concern, especially when it comes to spreading misinformation ahead of the 2020 presidential election. The advancements in deepfake technology were demonstrated this week at an MIT tech conference, where the tech was used to portray an interview in real-time with Russian president Vladimir Putin. Deepfake artist Hao Li, who created the Putin deepfake, said at the conference that deepfakes could be "perfect and virtually undetectable" within a few years, but we're not quite there yet. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. A recent tech conference held at MIT had an unexpected special guest make an appearance: Russian President Vladimir Putin. Of course, it wasn't actually Putin who appeared on-screen at the EmTech Conference, hosted earlier this week at the embattled, Jeffrey Epstein-linked MIT Media Lab. The Putin figure on-stage is, pretty obviously, a deepfake: an artificial intelligence-manipulated video that can make someone appear to say or do something they haven't actually said or done. Deepfakes have been used to show a main "Game of Thrones" character seemingly apologize for the show's disappointing final season, and to show Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg appearing to admit to controlling "billions of people's stolen data." Read more: From porn to 'Game of Thrones': How deepfakes and realistic-looking fake videos hit it big The Putin lookalike on-screen is glitchy and has a full head of hair (Putin is balding), and the person appearing on-stage with him doesn't really try to hide the fact that he's truly, just interviewing himself: This is the deepfake of @glichfield interviewing Vladimir Putin (wink wink nudge nudge). #EmTechMIT pic.twitter.com/PHoFV2iTPH — MIT Technology Review (@techreview) September 18, 2019   However, the point of the Putin deepfake wasn't necessarily to trick people into believing the Russian president was on stage. The developer behind the Putin deepfake, Hao Li, told the MIT Technology Review that the Putin cameo was meant to offer a glimpse into the current state of deepfake technology, which he's noticed is "developing more rapidly than I thought." Li predicted that "perfect and virtually undetectable" deepfakes are only "a few years" away. "Our guess that in two to three years, [deepfake technology] is going to be perfect," Li told the MIT Technology Review. "There will be no way to tell if it's real or not, so we have to take a different approach." As Putin's glitchy appearance shows, deepfake technology has yet to perfect real-time believable deepfakes. However, the tech is advancing quickly: One example is the Chinese deepfake app Zao, which lets people superimpose their faces into those of celebrities in really convincing face-swaps. The advancement of AI technology has made deepfakes more believable, and it's now even more difficult to decipher real videos from doctored ones. These concerns have led Facebook to pledge $10 million into research on detecting and combatting deepfakes. Additionally, federal lawmakers have caught onto the potential dangers of deepfakes, and even had a hearing in June about "the national security threats posed by AI-enabled fake content." AI experts also have raised concerns that deepfakes could play a role in the 2020 presidential election.SEE ALSO: People are roasting Apple for trying to make 'slofies' happen Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Here's why phone companies like Verizon and AT&T charge more for extra data
  • The Google Pixel 3 is $350 off at Best Buy — and you'll get a free Nest Hub if you order one 19/09/2019
    Google's Pixel 3 is an excellent, affordable smartphone with one of the best cameras on the market. For a limited time, you can get an unlocked Pixel 3 from Best Buy for just $449.99 — $350 off its original price.  You'll also get a free Google Nest Hub (normally $129) if you purchase an unlocked or Verizon model of the phone.  You can get the phones from Verizon for $300 off or from Sprint for $200 off too.  It's official: The Google Pixel 4 is coming. Google is expected to announce its newest flagship phone October 15 at a hardware event in New York City, alongside a Nest-branded version of its Home Mini smart speaker. That means if you're a user who doesn't need the latest smartphone, this is an excellent time to buy last year's Pixel 3.  Best Buy, likely attempting to clear out its old inventory before the new devices roll in, has announced multiple discounts on Pixel 3 phones. You'll save $350 if you buy the phone unlocked, $300 if you order through Verizon, and $200 if you order through Sprint and activate immediately. You'll also get a free Google Nest Hub smart display that normally costs $129 if you order an unlocked or Verizon model.  Why buy the Pixel 3? Despite being last year's model, Google's Pixel 3 is still an excellent phone, especially at a sub-$500 price. It supports wireless charging and ships with an excellent pair of USB-C earbuds. You also get a bright OLED screen that looks great and solid battery life that lasted 15-18 hours in our testing.  But the main reason to get the Pixel 3 is the camera. This phone contains a wide-angle selfie lens in addition to its standard front shooter, so you can now take ultra-wide photos with your friends. The rear camera takes better photos than competing iPhones, with excellent portraits and a night mode for low-light shots. We don't know how long this deal will last, so take advantage soon if you're interested. Adding the unlocked or Verizon Pixel 3 to your cart will automatically add a Nest Hub as well.  Buy the Pixel 3 (unlocked, 64GB) from Best Buy for $449.99 (originally $799.99) [You save $350 and get a free Nest Hub] Buy the Pixel 3 (Verizon, 64GB) from Best Buy for $499.99 (originally $799.99) [You save $300 and get a free Nest Hub] Buy the Pixel 3 (Verizon, 128GB) from Best Buy for $599.99 (originally $899.99) [You save $300 and get a free Nest Hub] Buy the Pixel 3 (Sprint, 64GB) from Best Buy for $549 (originally $749.99) [You save $200]Join the conversation about this story »
  • Officials just confirmed 7 deaths and 530 cases of serious lung disease tied to vaping. Here are all the health risks you should know about. 19/09/2019
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Food and Drug Administration are investigating a spate of lung illnesses tied to vaping, or using e-cigarettes. According to new numbers released on Thursday, there have been 530 confirmed and probable cases of illness across the US since June. Seven people have died. Investigators don't know the cause. They haven't identified a single common brand, product, or drug across all of the cases. The mysterious lung disease isn't the only risk of vaping. Read on to see how vaping affects your health. Still, when compared against smoking, vaping nicotine appears to be healthier. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Since June, 530 people in the US have been struck with lung illnesses tied to vaping, or using e-cigarettes. Seven people have died. The new figures, released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention on Thursday, include confirmed and probable lung-illness cases from 38 states and one territory. US officials said they expect the number of deaths tied to vaping to increase. As of Sept. 17, about two thirds of the cases were in people between the ages of 18 and 34, and another 16% were in people under 18. Roughly 75% of the cases have been reported in men. Vaping is a highly variable hobby, making it difficult for officials to determine exactly what's causing the illnesses and deaths. Investigators have not yet identified a single common brand, device type, or drug across the cases. That could mean that all of the illnesses were triggered by the same issue, or that some of the cases are different diseases with some similar symptoms. The CDC and the Food and Drug Administration are working together to figure out the potential causes. The agencies have previously said they've gathered about 120 vaping devices and substances that may be linked to the illnesses, and are currently studying them.  "It is too early to pinpoint a single product or substance common to all cases," CDC said in an earlier statement. Officials have said that some patients used devices containing nicotine, while others vaped THC, and some vaped both substances. Some reports have suggested that vitamin E acetate, which has been found in some of the products, may play a role in the illnesses.  Read more: Vaping is leading to a spate of lung injuries, comas, and death. Lung experts say oils like vitamin E may be partially to blame. The CDC advised people to consider not vaping until it can figure out the cause of the illnesses. The agency also warned smokers who vape to not return to smoking, however. So far, the available evidence still suggests that when compared to smoking, vaping is a healthier habit. The practice involves inhaling heated vapor, rather than burned material. In general, vapers are believed to be exposed to fewer toxicants and cancer-causing substances than smokers.  To help prevent young people from vaping, Michigan said last week that it would ban flavored vaping products, making it the first state to do so. There are hundreds of different kinds of vaping devices There's an enormous amount of variety when it comes to vaping devices, ingredients, and brands — making it difficult to pinpoint any single cause. First, there are the all-in-one style devices, where all of the necessary pieces are contained in the device itself. These popular e-cigs are sold under brand names like Juul and Blu (for nicotine), and Pax (for cannabis). Then there are the modifiable tank-based e-cigs, in which pieces of the device can be bought separately, and users can customize everything from the temperature of the device to the drug ingredients. These modifiable setups have been linked with dangers in the past, including at least two deaths. Finally, there are the ingredients that go into the devices, which can range from waxes to liquids to ground plant matter. Some devices allow users to pour in their own liquid or stuff in their own wax or herbs, while other devices simply include disposable pre-filled cartridges. In some of the cases reported to health agencies, users said they were vaping cannabis when their illness occurred. In Oregon, health officials said they had received reports that the person who died had been vaping cannabis. But because marijuana is still illegal in many states, it's possible that those cases are under-reported. Other vapers in the reports have been using only nicotine. In many of the cases, patients said they experienced a gradual start of symptoms like trouble breathing, shortness of breath, and chest pain before they were brought to the hospital. Some people said they also experienced stomach issues including vomiting and diarrhea. A new practice with several unknowns Vaping is a relatively new practice, having only became popular within the past decade. Because of its novelty, researchers have warned that there's a lot we still don't know about how the practice impacts the brain and body. "Given their relatively recent introduction, there has been little time for a scientific body of evidence to develop on the health effects of e-cigarettes," the authors of a large recent report on the overall health effects of vaping wrote. Recently-discovered health risks range from a heightened exposure to toxic metals to a potentially higher risk of a heart attack. Last spring, for example, researchers examining the vapors in several popular e-cigarette brands found evidence that they contained some of the same toxic metals normally found in conventional cigarettes, such as lead. They also found evidence suggesting that at least some of those toxins were making their way through vapers' bodies. Their results were published in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. Consistently inhaling high levels of toxic metals has been tied to health problems in the lungs, liver, immune system, heart, and brain, as well as some cancers, according to the US Department of Labor's Occupational Health and Safety Administration.  In a study published last fall in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, scientists found evidence tying daily e-cigarette use to an increased risk of a heart attack. Still, the study could not conclude that vaping caused the heart attacks — only that the two were linked. When it comes to the spate of recent lung illnesses, health departments are further investigating by testing e-cigarette products and samples they've collected from patients. But vaping seems to have helped hook millions of teens on nicotine  Separately, vaping appears to have helped hook lots of new young people on nicotine — in some cases, young people who otherwise would not have smoked. E-cigarettes have been tied to a large recent jump in smoking among middle school and high school students. From 2017 to 2018, the percentage of teens who said they'd used e-cigs jumped 78%, according to the CDC. Preliminary data for this year shows that e-cig use has continued to increase among teens. Because they contain nicotine, e-cigarettes are especially dangerous for kids and teens whose brains are still developing, experts say. In young people, nicotine appears to blunt emotional control as well as decision-making and impulse-regulation skills. That most likely helped prompt a warning about e-cigs from the US surgeon general in December. The rise in youth vaping prompted a crackdown on the industry led by the FDA. The agency responded by curbing the sale of flavored e-cigs, which they've said are particularly appealing to young people. "Ultimately, we expect these steps designed to address flavors and protect youth will dramatically limit the ability of kids to access tobacco products we know are both appealing and addicting," Scott Gottlieb, who was then FDA commissioner, said in a statement at the time. This article was published on August 30 and has been updated.SEE ALSO: 11 key findings from one of the most comprehensive reports ever on the health effects of vaping Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Look inside the 3D-printed Mars home that NASA awarded $500,000

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  • Newsletter 2018.09 21/09/2018
    We're Hiring IT Specialists | 緊急募集!- ITスペシャリスト • WordPress Web Hosting for Business • DNS Hosting with Cloudflare • Introducing Microsoft Azure • Grow Your Business Efficiently • Do Business Anywhere with Microsoft Solutions • Office 365 Update for September 2018 [video] • New iPhones and Apple Watch Unveiled [video] • Outlook User Experience Update [video] • iOS 12 – The New Features • macOS Mojave Coming Late September • Microsoft Teams is ready to replace Skype for Business • Surface Event Announced for October 2nd
  • Newsletter 2018.08 27/08/2018
    New Tokyo Office Space in Cool Neighborhood with On-site Tech Support • 東京オフィススペースレンタル – オンサイトのITサポート付き! | 5 Must-have Microsoft Apps | Why should your small-midsize business use Office 365? | Why move your data to the cloud? | Are you connecting with your customers? | Office 365 Update for August 2018 [video] | Tip: Set an email flag, reminder, or color in Outlook 2016 [video] | New Microsoft 365 Public Roadmap Out Soon | Big tech warns of 'Japan's millennium bug' ahead of Akihito's abdication | Samsung is about to make 4TB SSDs and mobile storage cheaper

  • iOS 13 – Top 3 New Features 18/09/2019
    iOS 13 is due to arrive on September 19, 2019. Here are the top 3 new features we’re most looking forward to.
  • Windows 10 Update Woes 03/09/2019
    A new Windows 10 update has a serious problem with extremely high and abnormal CPU and memory usage, slowing some PCs to a crawl.
  • Why Choose Office 365? [VIDEOS] 21/11/2018
    Get a taste of why we love Office 365 so much in this easy-to-digest video playlist, cut up into 1-3 minute bite-sized chunks.
  • New Microsoft Surface Devices 04/10/2018
    Microsoft announced some exciting upgrades to the Surface family of devices on October 2nd, two of which feature a new all-black matte finish. Find out more about the Surface Pro 6, Surface Laptop 2, Surface Studio 2, and Surface Headphones.
  • AutoSave Comes to Office 365 27/09/2018
    Starting September 2018, a new Office 365 AutoSave feature will be activated by default in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. This is great for cloud collaboration and preventing data loss, but may require some adjustments to your current workflows.
  • 5 Must-have Microsoft Apps 10/08/2018
    Five essential Microsoft apps for Office 365 users on the move – from exciting new arrival Whiteboard to the indispensable Teams and more
  • More Microsoft Surface Go Videos Arrive 25/07/2018
    Microsoft just released a series of short, sweet promos for the upcoming Surface Go, highlighting its portability and versatility. Check out all ten spots and the Surface Go launch video in our playlist.
  • Warning – Microsoft Office 365 Phishing Email 19/07/2018
    An email scam designed to harvest Office 365 login details is currently doing the rounds. Find out how to spot this and similar phishing campaigns.
  • Surface Hub 2. Hubba Hubba. [video] 19/07/2018
    Confession – we can't stop thinking about the Surface Hub 2 and how cool it would look in our clients' offices. Check out the official video for yourself and follow us for Japan availability.
  • Chrome Countdown – Time to secure your website with HTTPS 13/07/2018
    Google Chrome 68, due late July 2018, will mark all http sites as 'not secure' in the browser's address bar. Find out how this will impact your website.