Technology News

Technology News

  • A Wall Street firm figured out how much money Google will sacrifice by cutting off Huawei (GOOG, GOOGL) 24/05/2019
    President Trump's blacklisting of Huawei led Google to announce that it would be pulling its Android license from smartphones made by the Chinese manufacturing giant. That means users with new Huawei devices will no longer be able to download apps from the Play Store, which could cost the tech giant hundreds of millions of dollars per year.  Analysts at Nomura Instinet wrote that Google could lose between $375 million and $425 million per year in a "worst case" scenario from the Huawei ban. Managing Director at Wedbush Securities, Dan Ives, estimates that it will be closer to $150 million to $200 million per year. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Google's decision to cut off China's Huawei could cost it as much as $425 million in lost annual revenue. That's the estimate from equity research firm Nomura Instinet, which crunched the numbers in response to the news that Google will no longer license its Android smartphone software to Huawei. Google doesn't have much choice in the matter. The Trump administration placed Huawei on a blacklist this month, making it almost impossible for US companies to do business with the Chinese smartphone and telecom equipment maker.  That means new Huawei devices in markets around the world will no longer be able to run the version of Android that comes with all the latest security patches, access cutting-edge Google services like Assistant, or download apps from the Google Play store.  Huawei's breakup with the Google Play store, in which Google typically takes a 30% cut of every transaction, is where Google stands to lose the most. Instinet pegs the general range in potential lost Play Store sales for Google between $375 million to $425 million.  The biggest impact will be in Europe Instinet estimated that Huawei currently has around 500 million smartphone users worldwide. But 52% of Huawei phone owners are in China, where Google Play is not available, according to Instinet's estimates. So Google would only feel an impact in markets — like Europe and Asia (excluding China) — where it profits from app sales today.   Google generated $7 billion in global Play Store sales in 2018, Instinet estimates. The portion of that $7 billion that comes from Huawei phones is likely around $388 million, according to Instinet's calculations. The biggest driver of that revenue is in Europe, where Google generated $190 million from Play Store sales on Huawei devices last year, Instinet reckons. Huawei users in Asia (excluding China) contributed about $137 million in Play Store sales, according the report. Huawei "switchers" will make a difference That blow would likely be softened, they wrote, because some users will switch to phones from another manufacturer to be able to access a fully-loaded Android experience. Huawei has announced it was developing its own operating system to replace Android on its devices, but experts are highly skeptical that consumers will react positively to the switch.  "You can build a different OS… but what are consumers going to do for search, for maps, for YouTube?" Carolina Milanesi, Principal Analyst at Creative Strategies, told Business Insider in a recent interview. "All of these things have alternatives, but why would I do that? It's not like Huawei's phones are that amazing that I would forego all the services I've been using for years." Read more: Google has more control over Android than we realize, and right now, companies like Huawei have no other choice but to accept that Colin Sebastian, Senior Equity Research Analyst at Baird & Co., told Business Insider that he thinks "most impacted [Huawei] users" will start looking to switch to devices made by other companies.  "My general assumption is that since there aren't really viable alternatives to Android/Google apps (except for Apple), then most impacted users would migrate to other Android devices," Sebastian said. "Obviously there could be a transition period, but my guess is it would happen pretty quickly."  Others, like Managing Director at Wedbush Securities Dan Ives, think Huawei will some lose market share in places like Europe, but that it won't be a doomsday scenario for the world's second-largest smartphone manufacturer.  In terms of revenue losses for Google, Ives estimates that it will be closer to $150 million to $200 million per year. And for a company that brought in over $130 billion in revenue in 2018, Ives said these upcoming losses are a "rounding error" for the tech giant and that "ultimately the bark may be a lot worse than the bite."  Do you work at Google? Got a tip? Contact this reporter via Signal or WhatsApp at +1 (209) 730-3387 using a non-work phone, email at nbastone@businessinsider.com, Telegram at nickbastone, or Twitter DM at @nickbastone.SEE ALSO: A longtime industry expert explains why Trump's attack on Huawei could end up hurting Google and other US tech giants Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 5G networks will be 10 times faster than 4G LTE, but we shouldn't get too excited yet
  • How 3PL providers can thrive in light of their changing relationship with retail partners 24/05/2019
    This is a preview of a research report from Business Insider Intelligence,Business Insider's premium research service. To learn more about Business Insider Intelligence, click here. Current subscribers can read the report here. Third-party logistics (3PL) providers have been the cornerstone of retail supply chains for decades. 3PL providers are defined by the Council of Supply Chain Management Professionals (CSCMP) as "a specialized company that handles the outsourcing of much or all of a company's logistics operations." Today, the term has become nearly synonymous with any company in the logistics industry that operates planes, trucks, or warehouses.  But the rapid growth of e-commerce has given rise to new services and business models, challenging the 3PL model. Traditional 3PL relationships are well suited to route orders from a factory to a distribution center to a brick-and-mortar store, but they're typically ill-equipped to bring parcels to customers' homes. Historically, retail supply chains had a single destination: stores. And even the largest retailers only had a few thousand of them — Walmart operates 5,000 stores in the US and Puerto Rico, for instance — allowing retailers to rely on a handful of 3PL providers that had warehouses near their brick-and-mortar locations.  But the rise of online shopping has turned that model upside down. Now, retailers must deliver their products directly to the homes of the more than 300 million consumers in the US — and increasingly within only a few days — a far greater challenge than delivering directly to stores. Meeting this challenge requires a higher number of supply chain partners than before, meaning products often change hands several times before they arrive at a consumer's door. To effectively manage this complex new environment, some retailers are opting for one of two approaches to supply chain management: fourth-party logistics (4PL) providers or in-house supply chain management. In Future Business Models in Logistics, Business Insider Intelligence details how the rise of e-commerce as a core consumer shopping channel has fundamentally transformed retail supply chains. We examine the primary two business models — 4PL and in-house supply chain management — and what's driving retailers to adopt these new models. Lastly, we offer recommendations for how legacy 3PL providers can adapt to meet the changing demands of retailers in the age of e-commerce. The companies mentioned in this report are: Accenture, Deloitte, McKinsey, CH Robinson, Penske Logistics, UPS, DHL, XPO Logistics, JB Hunt, Kuehne and Nagel, Amazon, Alibaba, and JD.com. Here are some of the key takeaways from the report: Retailers' supply chains are being crunched: They must deliver a higher volume of goods to more locations than ever before, and must do so faster — a significantly greater challenge than delivering to brick-and-mortar stores. Such complexities require more 3PL partners than ever, requiring a separate entity to coordinate and manage the relationship between all these partners. Two popular models have emerged: 4PL providers and in-house supply chain managers. 4PL providers typically fall into one of two buckets: legacy 3PL providers that have transitioned into the 4PL space, and management consultancies that have long had supply chain management practices. Both 4PL providers and in-house supply chain management teams need to get comfortable collaborating with longtime competitors if they are to thrive in the managed supply chain environment. Legacy 3PL providers that transition into the 4PL space must carve out a separate business unit to house their 4PL business segments. In full, the report: Outlines several factors that legacy 3PL providers need to consider when deciding whether to transition into the 4PL space. Details why not all 3PL providers need to reinvent the wheel and carve out their own 4PL arms to thrive in the age of managed retail supply chains. Explains why legacy 3PL providers will be left behind if they don't learn to cooperate well with both 4PL providers and other 3PL providers. Interested in getting the full report? Here are two ways to access it: Purchase & download the full report from our research store. >>Purchase & Download Now Subscribe to a Premium pass to Business Insider Intelligence and gain immediate access to this report and over 100 other expertly researched reports. As an added bonus, you'll also gain access to all future reports and daily newsletters to ensure you stay ahead of the curve and benefit personally and professionally. >> Learn More Now The choice is yours. But however you decide to acquire this report, you've given yourself a powerful advantage in your understanding of the fast-moving world of Transportation & Logistics.Join the conversation about this story »
  • Hewlett Packard Enterprise is projecting a strong outlook for the rest of the year — but the CEO says that the overall data center market slowdown is his 'biggest worry' (HPE) 24/05/2019
    Hewlett-Packard Enterprise CEO Antonio Neri says the tech giant is grappling with market uncertainty marked by longer sales cycles. The tech giant's most recent financial results, announced on Thursday, were welcomed by Wall Street— especially after HPE raised its outlook. But Wedbush's head of technology trading says the results underline HPE's struggles in the cloud. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories Hewlett Packard Enterprise boosted its profit outlook for the year, which is lifting its shares up some 1% on Friday. But CEO Antonio Neri says the tech giant is grappling with a more ambivalent corporate tech market. HPE's stock was ahead 2% in afternoon trades. On Thursday, the tech giant raised its adjusted profit outlook for the current fiscal year to a range of $1.62 to $1.72 a share, up from a previous target of $1.56 to $1.66 a share. "There is uncertainty there, and the uncertainty drives elongated sales cycles," he told Business Insider. "That's my biggest worry." To his point: After seeing a strong uptick in 2018, corporate IT spending has hit pause, which was also highlighted in the recent earnings reports of chipmakers Intel and Nvidia, which make chips that power data centers and cloud platforms. Read more: New Intel CEO Bob Swan takes a humble tone in a meeting with investors after a huge earnings shortfall: 'We let you down' The good news, for now, is that Wall Street was happy with HPE's second-quarter report, announced on Thursday — which featured a dip in sales, but a higher earnings target for the year. It also comes in the wake of HPE's recent announcement that it intends to buy legendary supercomputing company Cray for $1.3 billion. But on the call with analysts, Neri said that some HPE deals were not closing in the time the company expected. "The longer the uncertainty goes, the worse it gets," Neri said on the call. "We continue to monitor to see what else we can do." HPE's two main businesses posted lower sales. Its division focused on networking equipment, which includes products from its Aruba Networks subsidiary, saw revenue fall by 6% year-over-year, while its hybrid cloud business, which includes high performance computing systems, severs and data storage, reported a 4% drop. Lingering uncertainty HPE was the product of the 2015 split of Hewlett-Packard, the iconic Silicon Valley giant, which once sold everything from PCs and printers to servers, storage systems used for data centers and cloud platforms. HPE got the data center and cloud stuff, and is slugging it out with longtime rivals such as IBM and Microsoft. But it has struggled in the battle for the cloud, where HPE is pushing a hybrid strategy — offering products and services that integrate its own servers and data center hardware with the major cloud computing platforms, including Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure. Revenue for that hybrid business slipped last quarter. HPE reported gains in operating margin, which IDC President Crawford Del Prete "shows positive momentum around their strategy to go after higher margin pools." But the company's Aruba Networks business, which competes head-to-head with the likes of Cisco, clearly showed some weakness. "I don't think there's something wrong with the Aruba product set per se, but they are not executing in the US," he told Business Insider. "This is clearly a sales issue." 'Cloud cannibalization' Joel Kulina, head of technology trading at Wedbush, said HPE's sluggish revenue underscores the impact of the ongoing shift to the cloud. Cloud computing has allowed companies to access computing power via the web, dramatically lowering their IT costs since they don't have to spend a fortune building their own data centers. This trend has hurt big tech companies selling high-margin computing gear, including HPE. "These results are a reminder that last year's robust enterprise spend was an outlier," he told Business Insider. And that robust spend, he said, "will likely be followed by years of sluggishness/declining revenue trends for the enterprise server and storage market as cautious capex spend and cloud cannibalization weighs on enterprise budget allocation." Got a tip about Hewlett-Packard Enterprise or another tech company? Contact this reporter via email at bpimentel@businessinsider.com, message him on Twitter @benpimentel, or send him a secure message through Signal at 510.731.8429. You can also contact Business Insider securely via SecureDrop.  Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 14 details in 'Game of Thrones' season 8 episode 4 you may have missed
  • The managing director of a nonprofit founded by BlackRock and McKinsey explains the one thing companies can do to be more like Amazon 24/05/2019
    Want to be more like Amazon? Think long-term, says Alison Loat, the managing director of FCLT Global, a nonprofit that researches and advocates for long-term investors. Amazon's board of directors has a statement of purpose that explicitly says that their job is to look out for long-term shareholders. Just creating a statement of purpose can make a difference in the right direction, Loat said last month at the Milken Institute Global Conference.  But this is just one strategy public companies can use to keep long-term value front of mind, she said. Executive compensation, quarterly guidance, and long-term road maps can all influence how a company performs over the long haul. Read more on the Business Insider homepage. Alison Loat is on a mission to end quarterly guidance, and BlackRock, McKinsey, and Dow are all on her side. Loat is the managing director at FCLT Global. It's a Canadian nonprofit founded by teams at McKinsey, the Canada Pension Plan Investment Board, Dow, BlackRock and India's Tata.  The firm thinks about investments over a 75-year period. Loat said that telling investors and analysts what to expect from quarter to quarter puts too much emphasis on what happens at a company in the short term.  What executives should be thinking about is what will happen over years, Loat told Business Insider from the Milken Institute Global Conference in Beverly Hills, California, last month. "There's the narrative that's set up where if you want to be long-term, you have to stay private for longer," Loat said. "But there's lots of stuff you could do on the public markets to be long-term as well." Thinking long-term is the name of the game for Loat. FCLT Global's name stands for Focusing Capital on the Long Term.  "We think about the baby born today and their retirement," she said. Read more: A Silicon Valley stock exchange backed by Peter Thiel and Andreessen Horowitz just got SEC approval FCLT does advocacy and research around one question: What changes can public companies implement to make them better investments for long-term shareholders? "We're trying to create a movement or momentum around this, bringing together people who make very material investment decisions everyday by the nature of their jobs," Loat said. To be like Amazon, write a statement of purpose To get there, FCLT has some best practices it recommends to all public companies. One is giving the board of directors a clear statement of purpose.  Amazon is an all-star in this arena, since the $914 billion company's board of directors has a mission statement that explicitly says its purpose is to "build long-term shareowner value." "It's a symbol, but it's important because of their way of orienting everyone and bringing them together over a shared objective," Loat said. Another tip: Don't give guidance. Companies are legally required to give quarterly financial updates, but quarterly guidance takes it a step further. When a company gives guidance, it tells investors what to expect in an upcoming quarter that hasn't closed yet. Apple, Cisco, and Twitter all issued quarterly guidance in their latest earnings, for example. "It's not a good practice, and it orients everybody around 'what am I going to do in three months?' Not, 'what am I going to do in three to five years,'" she said, adding that this leads to volatility that benefits only short-term traders. Instead of quarter-to-quarter guidance, FCLT recommends that companies create a long-term road map that includes their three-to-five-year plan, the key performance indicators for that period, and an outline of how the company plans to allocate capital to meet its goals. To quench investors' and analysts' desire for metrics, companies can give a quarterly update on that long-term road map, Loat said. And if all else fails — hit company leadership where it hurts. Executive compensation is another tool that can be used to keep companies on track for the long-term. Loat suggested companies lock up share compensation for five to 10 years — likely longer than the duration of the executive's term — so that leaders are motivated to think about the company's performance long after they have left.  "The upshot is, companies that act in a long-term way outperform others on basically any metric that matters, including job creation and contribution to GDP," Loat said.SEE ALSO: Uber, Tesla, and Slack show how Saudi cash is flowing into Silicon Valley. Here are 5 questions every US tech startup founder needs to ask before taking money from a foreign investor. Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: WATCH: The legendary economist who predicted the housing crisis says the US will win the trade war
  • A Wall Street firm focused on disruption is delusional when it comes to Tesla (TSLA) 24/05/2019
    Ark Invest is sticking to its bullish predictions about Tesla's future production capabilities. Much of the firm's case hinges on the creation of a Tesla autonomous ride-hailing network. But it's now proposing a $1,200-a-share (or higher) case based on the premise of Tesla selling over 1.5 million electric vehicles by 2023. There's a major problem here: Tesla currently lacks the manufacturing capacity to build more than 500,000 vehicles a year. It would be nearly impossible for Tesla to build enough new factories by 2023 to vindicate Ark's case. In the world of professional Tesla investors, Ark Invest and its chief, Cathie Wood, have gained some fame — or notoriety — for arguing that Tesla shares could hit $4,000 at some point in the not-so-distant future. On Friday, Tesla headed into the holiday weekend at $190, having dropped about 40% year-to-date. Depending on your point of view, this is either a rout or the markets at long last properly assessing Tesla as what it has been for the past five years: an overvalued, relatively small carmaker. Much of Ark's speculation around Tesla's potential hinges on the company shifting from the traditional (albeit electrified) auto business to a transportation-as-service operation, running a large fleet of what is now being routinely referred to as a robo-taxis, powered by Tesla's advanced Autopilot self-driving tech. Of course, there's still the established business of selling cars to consider, and on that front Ark now predicts Tesla will deliver, best case, 3 million vehicles by 2023. Worst case is 1.7 million. Ark is also hedging, but only in a manner of speaking: absent the robo-taxis, the stock could still get to $1,200. Read more: Tesla could escape 'production hell' for its Model 3 — but it would require a huge leap In 2018, Tesla sold about 250,000 vehicles. If the company maxed out production at its single factory in California, it could perhaps double that tally. The bottom line is that on the manufacturing side, Tesla would require not just one new factory to achieve what Ark calls its bull case, but four. To hit the bear case, it would need two — or to hire a contract manufacturer to handle the extra output. Tesla is adding capacity, just not enough Tesla is building a factory in China, so, optimistically, there's another half-million in annual production. At this juncture, that plant's assembly lines could be rolling by the middle of next year. If you do the math, you can see that Tesla is a factory short of reaching that 1.7 million by 2023. And it's three short on 3 million. What about the Nevada Gigafactory, where Tesla now makes batteries and drivetrains? Well, it could be pressed into service to assemble vehicles. But if you were going to build a car plant, the Reno vicinity would not be high on your list. Tesla's California factory is already off the grid of the US auto-manufacturing supply chain, which is found in the South and the Upper Midwest. Tesla could really use a plant in, say, Tennessee. You'll note that I haven't even delved into how Tesla would pay for new plants. If it were an established carmaker, it would borrow the money and watch inflation reduce its cost over decades of operation. But given its volatile financials, Tesla may not have that option at the scale it requires. At least not until its balance sheet settles down. This week, the Ark analysts Tasha Keeney and Sam Korus published an outline of their case for a more robust Tesla valuation — more than $4,000 a share, an astonishing example of zagging while the rest of the market is zigging. It contains a lot of financial jabber and offers open access to the firm's model, but the whole thing is reverse engineered from those higher production figures — which, as far as I can tell, Ark believes are plausible through the addition of one new Gigafactory. I've been following Ark's position on Tesla for a while. It is, in a word, entertaining. There's nothing wrong with entertainment: Humans like to laugh. There's also nothing wrong with offering wild, blue-sky takes on where Tesla is headed. Anything that spurs debate and discussion around the company is a good thing, and investors should be grown-ups who can decide where to put their money all by themselves. Delusional to the core The core problem with Ark's analysis, however, is that it's premised on a delusion. You can't build 3 million vehicles by 2023 if you can build just 500,000, max, in 2019 (Tesla isn't going to build that many, and even when its factory was fully utilized back in the 1980s, as a GM-Toyota joint venture, it managed just about 450,000). My own best case for Tesla production would involve hiring Magna, the world's largest contract manufacturer, to build the Model 3 and the Model Y crossover. But when I floated the idea to Magna's CEO, he said it would still take a year to a year and a half, assuming a finished design. A from-scratch design would require three years. There is also the matter of selling the cars you produce. It's not clear what the right level of production is for Tesla to meet demand. The electric-vehicle market is supposed to grow in the next decade. But over the past decade, it's grown far slower than expected. For Tesla, it could make sense to settle into a production plateau for a few years to find out whether it has stable demand for, say, half a million vehicles. That would not mean a $50 billion market cap, of course. Nor would it lead to $4,000 a share. In the end, I get why Ark continues to press on with what I would characterize as its delusional Tesla position. It's swell marketing, and if you want to wager on disruption, Tesla's story represents an easy bet (even if there isn't any real disruption, according to the guy who developed the theory). But Ark really does need to fill in the gaping blank about where all those millions of Teslas are going to come from by 2023.FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: Tesla unveiled its Model Y — here are the best features of the $39,000 SUV
  • Samsung could emerge as the big winner from Huawei's miserable week (GOOG, INTC) 24/05/2019
    Huawei is Samsung's biggest competitor in the worldwide smartphone market. But without Google's Android, it could be difficult for Huawei to expand outside China. This could make Samsung's position at the top of the smartphone market all the more certain, leaving Apple as the only meaningful threat to its dominance. If Huawei's foldable smartphone, the Mate X, does not run on Google's Android, it could make the device noticeably less appealing — therefore leaving an opportunity for Samsung to emerge as a leader in the foldable-phone market despite its rocky Galaxy Fold launch. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories.   The biggest winner in the US government's battle with China's Huawei could turn out to be Samsung's smartphones. The South Korean tech giant has seen its perch at the top of the smartphone market threatened by Huawei's surging tide of handhelds. And Samsung's recent missteps in the rollout of its cutting-edge foldable phone, which was delayed because of quality problems, have added further uncertainty to Samsung's reign. But the Trump administration's decision to put Huawei on a US trade blacklist could be the helping hand Samsung needs to retain its status as the world's unrivaled smartphone superpower.  The blacklist has forced tech companies such as Google and Intel to suspend business with Huawei. That means Huawei's future phones will not be able to run on Google's Android operating system, the most popular mobile software. While Huawei says it has built its own homemade smartphone operating system that will be ready by next year, there's no guarantee that consumers will buy Huawei phones if they have a new, unknown operating system, especially if that means the phones don't have system-level access to popular Google services such as Gmail and Google Maps.  That's potentially good news for Samsung, which has been steadily losing market share to Huawei. In the first three months of 2019, Samsung accounted for 23.1% of the worldwide smartphone market, representing an 8.1% decrease from the year-ago period, according to the International Data Corp. Huawei's position jumped 50% year-over-year to claim a 19% share of the market in the first quarter. Besides Huawei, no other smartphone maker comes close to Samsung in terms of the global market share. Apple trailed in third place with 11.7% of the market in the first quarter, whereas the China-based smartphone maker Xiaomi ranked fourth with 8% of the market. If Huawei sees a dip in smartphone sales as a result of these new US government requirements, rivals like Apple and Xiaomi would still have a lot of catching up to do in order to endanger Samsung's spot at the top. An Apple backlash in China That's not to say it's impossible and that Samsung's position at the top is guaranteed. The smartphone market often fluctuates between quarters based on a variety of factors, with Apple and Huawei usually switching back and forth to place in second behind Samsung. In the fourth quarter of 2018, for example, Apple held 18.2% of the worldwide smartphone market, coming very close to Samsung's 18.7% lead. Huawei placed in third with 16.1% of the market — although its share grew by 43.9% year-over-year, while both Apple's and Samsung's declined. But some analysts believe that the backlash against Huawei in the US could hurt Apple's business in China. A team of analysts at UBS recently circulated a note citing the treatment of Huawei in the US as a potential risk to Apple, writing that nationalist sentiment has been known to sometimes affect foreign goods in China. People in China also recently called for a boycott of Apple's products after the Trump administration's decision to put Huawei on a trade blacklist, according to BuzzFeed News. To be sure, Samsung's smartphones do not have a strong presence in China, according to data from Counterpoint Research, which doesn't even break out the Seoul-based tech giant in its ranking of the top smartphone vendors in the region. But China is important for Apple's business; it's the company's third-largest market, and the iPhone accounted for 12% of China's smartphone market as of the fourth quarter of 2018, according to Counterpoint Research. If there is a boycott against Apple products in China, it could make it more difficult for the company to broaden the iPhone's reach and catch up to Samsung's global market share. The folding-phone debacle There's another key way Samsung could stand to benefit from Huawei's misfortunes when it comes to the smartphone space: foldable phones. Samsung's Galaxy Fold got off to a rocky start to say the least after small number of reviewers reported that the device's screen had broken, prompting Samsung to indefinitely delay the Fold's launch. Samsung still hasn't said when the phone would be released. But the new restrictions Huawei faces when working with US companies could give Samsung's Galaxy Fold a second chance. Huawei unveiled its Mate X foldable phone just days after Samsung debuted the Fold in February, showcasing an impressively designed device with a crease that appeared to be less noticeable than the one found on Samsung's phone. Huawei hasn't announced when the phone would be released yet, making it unclear whether or not it will be able to run on Google's Android software. The US government has granted Huawei a 90-day reprieve that allows it to maintain and support its products until August 19. But we don't know if the Mate X will launch before then, although a report from GizmoChina suggested it could be released in June. Losing Android would be a tough blow for Huawei, but it's especially damaging for a device as expensive as the Mate X, which will be priced at around $2,600 when it launches. For shoppers outside of China, not having Google's widely popular suite of services and its enormous app store could drastically lower the Mate X's value proposition should it not run on Google's software. There's also the concern as to whether or not the software on Huawei's Mate X will be as feature-rich and polished as foldable phones that run on Google's Android, considering the search giant has tailored the next version of Android to make it adaptable to foldable form factors. Of course, Huawei and Samsung are not the only companies working on foldable devices. Xiaomi and Motorola are developing foldable phones of their own, but neither of those products seem as far along as those made by Samsung and Huawei. That could leave Samsung with an opportunity to own the nascent foldable-smartphone market for a considerable amount of time should it relaunch the Galaxy Fold in the near future. It's too soon to know precisely what will happen to Huawei as a result of the US government's recent trade sanctions. The company has said it has been working on its own operating system to replace Android, and Ren Zhengfei, the company's CEO, recently told the Nikkei Asian Review that he expects the company's growth to slow only a little bit. But even if Zhengfei proves to be correct, and Huawei's growth only mildly slows, that's still bound to be good news for Samsung's reign over the global smartphone market.  SEE ALSO: Trump's Huawei ban may leave the tech giant up a creek without a paddle for its next 2 major smartphones Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 9 simple ways to protect your data that don't take much time, but could have huge security benefits
  • Uber's first employee and one of Travis Kalanick's last allies has left the company's board just 2 weeks after IPO (UBER) 24/05/2019
    Ryan Graves, Uber employee number 1 and its former CEO, is leaving Uber's board of directors, the company said in a filing Friday. It's unclear why Graves is leaving the board. The company said in its filing that the departure is not related to any disagreements. Graves' resignation comes just two weeks after Uber went public. Graves' personal stake in the company is valued around $1.4 billion. Visit BusinessInsider.com for more stories. Ryan Graves, Uber's first-ever employee and its former CEO, has stepped down from the board of directors just two weeks after the ride-hailing company's massive initial public offering. In a statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Friday, the company said that Graves is not stepping down over any disagreement with the company, its management, its board, or any other matter related to Uber's operations, policies or practices.  It's unclear why he resigned. His resignation goes into effect on May 27. His departure comes just weeks after Uber went public in an $8.1 billion IPO that valued that company at $75.5 million. The share price has consistently hovered below its IPO price of $45 a share. Calculated at $43 per share, Graves' personal stake in Uber is worth $1.4 billion. Graves left Uber in 2017 after serving as senior vice president of global operations, and for a short time before that as CEO. But he remained on the board alongside disgraced former CEO Travis Kalanick and co-founder Garrett Camp. Read more: The career of Ryan Graves, Uber's first employee and billionaire CEO, was launched by a single tweet In a note to the board of directors shared with the SEC, Uber chairperson Ron Sugar described Graves' departure as "bittersweet." "Ryan was one of the key people who helped shape Uber into the company that it is today. As a thoughtful and engaged director, Ryan has continued to add value to Uber, offering insights and judgement that have helped us navigate the ups and downs of the business as we have grown over the past decade," Sugar said. "While this is a bittersweet moment, we accept his personal decision that this is the right time for him to step down. Dara and I are grateful for his contributions to Uber's success and wish him all the best going forward," he said.SEE ALSO: Palantir was expected to IPO in 2019, but that dream is now reportedly on hold until next year Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: 9 simple ways to protect your data that don't take much time, but could have huge security benefits
  • The Boeing 737 Max's return to the air has reportedly been delayed by regulators looking into emergency procedures on older Boeing jets (BA) 24/05/2019
    The Boeing 737 Max's return to commercial-airline service is reportedly being further delayed by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA). US government officials told The Wall Street Journal that the FAA is evaluating the emergency procedures for not only the Max but also the older generations of the 737, including the hot-selling Boeing 737 NG. "While we are working with the FAA to review all procedures, the safety of the 737 NG is not in question, with its 20-plus years of service and 200 million flight hours," a Boeing spokesman said in a statement.  Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. The Boeing 737 Max's return to commercial-airline service is reportedly being further delayed by the Federal Aviation Administration. US government officials told The Wall Street Journal's Andy Pasztor that the FAA is evaluating the emergency procedures for not only the Max but also the older generations of the 737, including the hot-selling Boeing 737 NG.  According to the officials, the broadened evaluation will take a look at how pilots of all 737 variants are instructed to respond to emergency situations. "While we are working with the FAA to review all procedures, the safety of the 737 NG is not in question, with its 20-plus years of service and 200 million flight hours," a Boeing spokesman said in a statement.  The FAA was not immediately available for comment. Read more: A Boeing executive reportedly shut down a theory during a meeting with American Airlines pilots about what might have led to the fatal Ethiopian 737 Max crash. The Boeing 737 NG is the third generation of the 737 and first entered service in 1997 with Southwest Airlines. It remains in production today. The NG, or Next Generation, includes the Boeing 737-600, 737-700, 737-800, and 737-900/900ER.  With more than 5,000 aircraft sold over the past few years, the 737 Max is the fastest-selling airliner in Boeing history. One of Boeing's strongest selling points for the Max is its commonality with the NG, which makes operations cheaper for airlines because they don't have to extensively retrain their 737 pilots. The major issue for Boeing and industry regulators is the flight system that is triggered by a sensor. MCAS, or the Maneuvering Characteristics Augmentation System, is a new control system found on board the 737 Max that was not disclosed to airlines and pilots until the Lion Air crash in October. Boeing confirmed in April that faulty readings from malfunctioning angle-of-attack sensors triggered MCAS ahead of both the Lion Air crash and the Ethiopian Airlines crash in March. In March, Boeing rolled out a series of proposed software updates designed to roll back the intrusiveness of MCAS, along with additional pilot training on the differences between the previous generation 737 NG and the 737 Max. All 371 Boeing 737 Max airliners in operation have been grounded around the world since March 13 after the crashes of Lion Air Flight JT610 and Ethiopian Airlines Flight ET302, which occurred less than five months apart. A total of 342 passengers and crew died in the two crashes.FOLLOW US: On Facebook for more car and transportation content! Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: How Emirates makes 225,000 region-specific meals a day for its passengers
  • Palantir was expected to IPO in 2019, but that dream is now reportedly on hold until next year 24/05/2019
    Palantir was expected to go public in 2019, but it looks like those plans have been pushed off to 2020, Bloomberg reported Friday. The secretive data analytics startup, whose clients include the US government, still faces a handful of hurdles before it can IPO. The company still needs to build out its board with independent directors, and it needs to hire more sales and finance employees before it will be ready to IPO, according to the report. Read more on the Business Insider homepage. One of the most highly-anticipated IPOs of 2019 is turning into the most highly-anticipated IPO of 2020. Palantir, the 15-year-old data startup run by CEO Alex Karp, is unlikely to go public in 2019 despite earlier comments from the company, according to Bloomberg.  The startup, which sells secretive data analytics tools to clients like the US government, grew its revenue by 40% last year up to around $1 billion, and has around $30 million in losses, according to the report, which cited anonymous sources.  Despite its growth, a number of on-going factors have slowed Palantir's march towards an IPO, according to the report. Among them, Palantir has just one independent board member, and it's lacking the staff on its sales and finance team that are needed to move forward with IPO preparation. Read more: A Silicon Valley stock exchange backed by Peter Thiel and Andreessen Horowitz just got SEC approval Both the Nasdaq and New York Stock Exchange require that the majority of a company's board is independent. At Palantir, three of the four board members are founders, according to Bloomberg. Palantir did not immediately respond to a request for comment on its IPO plans. It's unclear how much the company will be worth when it eventually does hit the public markets. Palantir last valued itself at $11 billion as recently as late last year, though Morgan Stanley has pegged the company's valuation as high as $41 billion, according to the report. Palantir's delay follows the mixed reception of other mega tech IPOs. Uber, which went public with a market cap of $75.5 billion, is still trading below its IPO price more than two weeks after its big debut. Its competitor Lyft has also struggled to keep up since getting a major pop on Day 1.  Yet, the IPOs keep coming. Next in line is Slack, which is expected to start trading in June through a direct listing. On Monday, Slack filed updated registration paperwork changing its IPO ticker from "SK" to "WORK."SEE ALSO: Investors have seen triple-digit returns on some 2019 IPOs, but UBS think there are 2 key reasons it could cool by midsummer Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: This startup turns 100 non-recyclable plastic bags into a high-end Bluetooth speaker
  • How to open zip files on an iPad and extract their contents 24/05/2019
    Your iPad cannot create zip files that store multiple compressed files together unless you download a third party app. iPads can, however, provide access to the files contained within a zip, without having to install new apps or software. Here's how to open a zipped file on your iPad using the Files app that comes standard with the device. Visit Business Insider's homepage for more stories. Zip files are great for storing lots of large files in one place without taking up too much room on your device, and they're an ideal way to transfer large amounts of data from one piece of hardware to another. That is, as long as you can get into the zip file and extract the individual files within. Good news: if you have an iPad released in the past few years, you can open zip files and extract their files without having to download any new apps. While your iPad can't create a zipped file without third party software, you can always just create the zip on your computer, then send it to the iPad in question. How to open zip files with an iPad 1. Locate the Files app — its icon is white with a blue folder — and launch it. 2. Search for the name of the zip file (which will be "Archive" if you created it on a Mac and didn't rename it). 3. Click on the zip, which will have an icon that looks like a piece of paper reading "zip." 4. Tap "Preview Content." 5. Now find the file you want to extract, and tap the icon of the arrow pointing up out of the box at the top corner of the iPad screen. 6. Tap "Save to Files" from the taskbar at the bottom of the popup window. 7. Select the location where you'd like the file to be stored, then click "Add." The file will be extracted from the zip and saved to your iPad. Repeat as necessary to extract as many files you want (or all of them) from the zip. Related coverage from How To Do Everything: Tech: How to copy and paste on your iPad or iPhone, and from one device to the other How to backup your iPad to iCloud or a computer How to clear your browsing history on an iPad in three different ways How to make a zip file on your Mac computer, to save some storage space and clear digital clutter SEE ALSO: The best tablets you can buy Join the conversation about this story » NOW WATCH: I tried the $1,980 Samsung Galaxy Fold and it's impressive for a first-generation foldable phone, though far from perfect

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  • Newsletter 2018.09 21/09/2018
    We're Hiring IT Specialists | 緊急募集!- ITスペシャリスト • WordPress Web Hosting for Business • DNS Hosting with Cloudflare • Introducing Microsoft Azure • Grow Your Business Efficiently • Do Business Anywhere with Microsoft Solutions • Office 365 Update for September 2018 [video] • New iPhones and Apple Watch Unveiled [video] • Outlook User Experience Update [video] • iOS 12 – The New Features • macOS Mojave Coming Late September • Microsoft Teams is ready to replace Skype for Business • Surface Event Announced for October 2nd
  • Newsletter 2018.08 27/08/2018
    New Tokyo Office Space in Cool Neighborhood with On-site Tech Support • 東京オフィススペースレンタル – オンサイトのITサポート付き! | 5 Must-have Microsoft Apps | Why should your small-midsize business use Office 365? | Why move your data to the cloud? | Are you connecting with your customers? | Office 365 Update for August 2018 [video] | Tip: Set an email flag, reminder, or color in Outlook 2016 [video] | New Microsoft 365 Public Roadmap Out Soon | Big tech warns of 'Japan's millennium bug' ahead of Akihito's abdication | Samsung is about to make 4TB SSDs and mobile storage cheaper

  • Why Choose Office 365? [VIDEOS] 21/11/2018
    Get a taste of why we love Office 365 so much in this easy-to-digest video playlist, cut up into 1-3 minute bite-sized chunks.
  • New Microsoft Surface Devices 04/10/2018
    Microsoft announced some exciting upgrades to the Surface family of devices on October 2nd, two of which feature a new all-black matte finish. Find out more about the Surface Pro 6, Surface Laptop 2, Surface Studio 2, and Surface Headphones.
  • AutoSave Comes to Office 365 27/09/2018
    Starting September 2018, a new Office 365 AutoSave feature will be activated by default in Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. This is great for cloud collaboration and preventing data loss, but may require some adjustments to your current workflows.
  • 5 Must-have Microsoft Apps 10/08/2018
    Five essential Microsoft apps for Office 365 users on the move – from exciting new arrival Whiteboard to the indispensable Teams and more
  • More Microsoft Surface Go Videos Arrive 25/07/2018
    Microsoft just released a series of short, sweet promos for the upcoming Surface Go, highlighting its portability and versatility. Check out all ten spots and the Surface Go launch video in our playlist.
  • Warning – Microsoft Office 365 Phishing Email 19/07/2018
    An email scam designed to harvest Office 365 login details is currently doing the rounds. Find out how to spot this and similar phishing campaigns.
  • Surface Hub 2. Hubba Hubba. [video] 19/07/2018
    Confession – we can't stop thinking about the Surface Hub 2 and how cool it would look in our clients' offices. Check out the official video for yourself and follow us for Japan availability.
  • Chrome Countdown – Time to secure your website with HTTPS 13/07/2018
    Google Chrome 68, due late July 2018, will mark all http sites as 'not secure' in the browser's address bar. Find out how this will impact your website.
  • Microsoft Announces New Low-Cost Surface Go [video] 11/07/2018
    Microsoft just announced the Surface Go – a low-cost device modelled on the Surface Pro, with prices starting at US$399. Contact us for Japan availability.
  • Microsoft Business Applications Summit 2018 09/07/2018
    David Arthur Kinney and Alex Catlin of METHOD IT will be attending the Microsoft Business Applications Summit in Seattle, Washington, July 24-28, 2018. This is the first ever global bootcamp for Dynamics 365, Power BI, Excel, PowerApps, and Microsoft Flow, with over 200 expert sessions.